Heroku feature snapshot

A high-level look at Stitch's Heroku (v1) integration, including release status, useful links, and the features supported in Stitch.

STITCH
Release status

Released on July 31, 2018

Supported by

Stitch

Stitch plan

Free

Supported versions

9.3+

API availability

Available

Singer GitHub repository

singer-io/tap-postgres

CONNECTION METHODS
SSH connections

Unsupported

SSL connections

Supported

REPLICATION SETTINGS
Anchor Scheduling

Supported

Advanced Scheduling

Supported

Table-level reset

Supported

Configurable Replication Methods

Supported

REPLICATION METHODS
Log-based Replication

Unsupported

Key-based Replication

Supported

Full Table Replication

Supported

DATA SELECTION
Table selection

Supported

Column selection

Supported

View replication

Supported

TRANSPARENCY
Extraction Logs

Supported

Loading Reports

Supported

Connecting Heroku

Step 1: Locate the database connection details in Heroku

First, you’ll retrieve the Heroku database’s connection details. This info will be used to connect Stitch to your Heroku database.

  1. Sign into your Heroku account.
  2. Click the app that contains the database you want to connect to Stitch. This will open the app’s dashboard page.
  3. Locate the Installed add-ons setion and click the Heroku Postgres database you want to connect to Stitch. This will open the database’s dashboard page.
  4. Click the Settings tab.
  5. Click the View Credentials… button. This will display the database credentials:

    Heroku Connection Settings

Leave this page open for now - you’ll need it to wrap things up.

Step 2: Connect Stitch

In this step, you’ll complete the setup by entering the database’s connection details and defining replication settings in Stitch.

Step 2.1: Define the database connection details in Stitch

  1. If you aren’t signed into your Stitch account, sign in now.
  2. On the Stitch Dashboard page, click the Add Integration button.

  3. Locate and click the Heroku icon.
  4. Fill in the fields as follows:

    • Integration Name: Enter a name for the integration. This is the name that will display on the Stitch Dashboard for the integration; it’ll also be used to create the schema in your destination.

      For example, the name “Stitch Heroku” would create a schema called stitch_heroku in the destination. Note: The schema name cannot be changed after the integration is saved.

    • Host (Endpoint): Paste the Host address from the Heroku Database Settings page into this field.

    • Port: Enter the port used by the instance. The default is 5432.

    • Username: Paste the User name from the Heroku Database Settings page into this field.

    • Password: Paste the Password from the Heroku Database Settings page into this field.

    • Database: Paste the Database name from the Heroku Database Settings page into this field.

    • Include PostgreSQL schema names in destination tables: Checking this setting will include schema names from the source database in the destination table name - for example: <source_schema_name>__<table_name>.

      Stitch loads all selected replicated tables to a single schema, preserving only the table name. If two tables canonicalize to the same name - even if they’re in different source databases or schemas - name collision errors can arise. Checking this setting can prevent these issues.

      Note: This setting can not be changed after the integration is saved. Additionally, this setting may create table names that exceed your destination’s limits. For more info, refer to the Database Integration Table Name Collisions guide.

Step 2.2: Define the SSL connection details

Because Heroku enforces SSL by default, you don’t need to take any further action to encrypt your data. Skip to the next step.

Step 2.3: Create a replication schedule

In the Replication Frequency section, you’ll create the integration’s replication schedule. An integration’s replication schedule determines how often Stitch runs a replication job, and the time that job begins.

Heroku integrations support the following replication scheduling methods:

To keep your row usage low, consider setting the integration to replicate less frequently. See the Understanding and Reducing Your Row Usage guide for tips on reducing your usage.

Step 2.4: Save the integration

When finished, click Check and Save.

Stitch will perform a connection test to the Heroku database; if successful, a Success! message will display at the top of the screen. Note: This test may take a few minutes to complete.

Step 3: Select data to replicate

The last step is to select select the tables and columns you want to replicate.

When you track a table, you’ll also need to define its Replication Method and, if using Key-based Incremental Replication, its Replication Key.

You can select tables and columns by:

  1. In the Integration Details page, click the Tables to Replicate tab.
  2. Locate a table you want to replicate.
  3. Click the checkbox next to the object’s name. A green checkmark means the object is set to replicate.
  4. If there are child objects, they’ll automatically display and you’ll be prompted to select some. Note: When you track a table, by default all columns will also be tracked.

  5. After you set a table to replicate, a page with the table’s columns will display. De-select columns if needed.

  6. In the Settings page, define the table’s Replication Method and, if using Key-based Incremental Replication, its Replication Key.

  7. Repeat this process for every table you want to replicate.

  8. Click the Finalize Your Selections button to save your data selections.

Initial and historical replication jobs

After you finish setting up Heroku, its Sync Status may show as Pending on either the Stitch Dashboard or in the Integration Details page.

For a new integration, a Pending status indicates that Stitch is in the process of scheduling the initial replication job for the integration. This may take some time to complete.

Free historical data loads

The first seven days of replication, beginning when data is first replicated, are free. Rows replicated from the new integration during this time won’t count towards your quota. Stitch offers this as a way of testing new integrations, measuring usage, and ensuring historical data volumes don’t quickly consume your quota.



Questions? Feedback?

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